Gregory G. H. Rihn (milwaukeesfs) wrote,
Gregory G. H. Rihn
milwaukeesfs

American Players Theatre, “An Ideal Husband”

On Saturday, June 25th, we drove over to Spring Green to see the opening night of the production of Oscar Wilde’s play, “An Ideal Husband.” We cannot recommend this performance too highly.

Wilde’s play, about a poor young man who built a brilliant political career on a fortune made by a single act of misfeasance, is very timely today. Sir Robert Chiltern (David Daniel) has a reputation for strict morality and honesty, and a loving wife (Colleen Madden) who keeps him on her pedestal of idealism. Indeed, all he has done in public life so far has adhered to those standards. Therefore, when he is threatened with the exposure of his past, the fall before him is terrible.

This drama is embedded in the type of comedy of manners that Wilde does so well, with an ongoing dialog about the “triviality” of life, society, parties, marriage, and fidelity, which continues oblivious of the desperate choice facing Sir Robert.

His best friend, Lord Goring (Marcus Truschinski), is the person who connects the worlds of the trivial and the serious. While constantly working on his “trivial” image, Goring turns out to be a steadfast friend and the voice of reason. As Wilde’s voice in the play, Goring has some of the most acerbic and witty commentary on society’s foibles, but also shows great heart and compassion.

There was really marvelous acting by all the principals. Daniel as shows us the agony of his situation. Ms. Madden displays the shock and horror Mrs. Chiltern feels when she finds out about her husband’s indiscretion like getting a punch in the stomach. Tracy Michele Arnold as Mrs. Cheveley has an edgy delivery that reminds one of a younger Dowager Duchess of Grantham. Jade Payton (as Mabel Chiltern), Greta Oglesby (Lady Markby), Cristina Panfilio (Lady Basildon), and Jennifer Latimore (Mrs. Marchmont), as the women of society were devastatingly funny discoursing on their amusements and their discontents.

The costumes were frankly amazing. The women’s party and day outfits were particularly spectacular, but Lord Goring’s orchidaceous suits were close behind. (Tall, slim, and elegant, Mr. Truschinski cuts a figure that Wilde would have envied--.) And, there were nice subtleties, such as the relatively conservative colors and cuts worn by the puritanical Mrs. Chiltern.
The minimal set backdrop was handsome and worked well, augmented by the period furniture and elegant flower arrangements.

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Tags: american players, theatre
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