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Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

Time Event
3:08p
Dining at Maison

On Saturday, August 5th, we went to dinner at the new French restaurant, Maison, on Vliet Street in Wauwatosa.

The building has been extensively remodeled since we were last in it, as a prior business, and the new look gives the feel of a French bistro as closely as any currently available restaurant in Milwaukee.

As usual for us, we dined early, so service was immediately available. We started, as we have made a practice of, with a plate of the house charcuterie. We found the selection du jour to be very good. We got good sized servings of pork pate maison, chicken liver pate, and duck prosciutto, garnished with cornichons, a couple of spears of pickled asparagus, and a beet-picked egg, accompanied by Dijon mustard and toasted bread. All of these were very good. The pate maison was had a mild but complex flavor, the chicken very smooth and surprisingly light, especially given that it was sealed with chicken fat. The duck prosciutto had nice flavor, but the meat had more the texture of “duck jerky”, and was the least successful of the meats.

For plats principeux, we chose a couple of bistro classics, coq au vin for Georgie, and I had the entrecote de boeuf (ribeye steak), or “steak frites”.  I ordered the steak medium rare, and chose red wine sauce with it. (Other choices were wild mushroom reduction, or “hotel butter”.) I also had the choice of having the meat grilled or pan-seared, and chose grilled. The steak was perfectly done, and the sauce gave it a delicious flavor. I was a bit surprised that the ‘frites’ were what I would call ‘matchstick fries’ rather than the common French fries or wedges. I was also surprised that they weren’t overdone, but had excellent texture and flavor. The downcheck on this style of fries is that dipping them in the mild aioli is a bit of a job. On the other hand, they soaked up the wine sauce nicely and a forkful was very tasty.

The coq au vin came as two large pieces of chicken (essentially a half chicken), accompanied by roasted fingerling potatoes, all in the red wine sauce with black trumpet mushrooms and shallots. The chicken was tender and delicious and the potatoes excellent as well. The sauce was very flavorful, a bit onionier tasting than some, perhaps due to the presence of the shallots instead of the pearl onions we often see.

Maison has an all-French wine list, with some very good vintages available by the glass. I had Maison Roche de Bellene “Cuvee Terroir” Coteaux du Bourguignons, and Georgie a Gerard Bertrand Gris Blanc Pays D’OC Rosé, and we were very pleased with both of them.

For desserts, we ordered the Orange Blossom Sabayon, a very soft custardy dish, and the “Homage to Meritage” chocolate ganache cake (the name is a nod to the Meritage restaurant that formerly occupied the space).  Both were excellent and not too heavy.

Service by Colin was quick, informative, and friendly. We will go back.

This entry was originally posted at http://sinister-sigils.dreamwidth.org/311222.html. Please comment there using OpenID.
3:13p
Milwaukee Masterpiece 2017

The “Milwaukee Masterpiece” car show moved to a different weekend this year, but at the same location in Veteran’s Park. We went to the Sunday Concours d’Elegance, and thought it a particularly good show.

This year’s theme was “Style and Speed,” and featured a particularly nice collection of classic Jaguars, a marque I am particularly fond of. There was also an “alternative” category, which had a good number of makes and models of steam and electric cars. There were some very handsome pre-war Packards (Georgie’s favorite), including a beautiful convertible Touring Car. There were also interesting examples of classic Rolls-Royce autos, one of which had a rarely seen Town Car body (the classic old-style “limousine” with the open driver’s compartment).

This entry was originally posted at http://sinister-sigils.dreamwidth.org/311350.html. Please comment there using OpenID.
3:14p
Dunkirk
Sunday, August 12, we went to see Dunkirk, the World War II film by director Christopher Nolan. We thought it generally well done and interesting and very well worth seeing, although perhaps too dire at times to be entirely enjoyable. Yes, it’s a war movie, and there’s a lot of dying in it. However, a lot of the death, by drowning or burning, is too present.

The movie has an interesting structure, with three braided narratives that eventually meet. The first is titled “The Mole: One Week.” This follows the events on the Dunkirk beaches and nearby, focusing on a British soldier who isn’t necessarily an example of stoic discipline while trying to get off the beach and back to England. “The Sea: One Day” follows one of the British “small ships” answering the call to aid the evacuation, and its voyage to and from the zone of danger. “The Air: One Hour” deals with a sortie of three British Spitfire fighters whose mission is to protect the beaches and sea lanes, and drive away the Luftwaffe bombers. The film shift from narrative to narrative was of necessity not in overall chronological order, so it took me a bit to put things together, but, once I did, I was struck by admiration for the skill of the story telling. As the film nears its climax, the three stories come together in increasing tempo, and you see the same events from as many as three different viewpoints.

While the presence of masterful actors such as Kenneth Branagh and Mark Rylance enhance the picture, the compelling story is the main event, and the actions of the desperate soldier, the intrepid pilots, and the boys who go along to Dunkirk to “do something” predominate.

Military history buff that I am, of course there are a few quibbles. The beaches are attacked several times by Stuka (Junkers Ju. 87) dive-bombers. The Stuka, a pre-war design, at that time typically carried a single large bomb slung under the fuselage, and in a couple of scenes you can see one bomb separate from the attacking plane. However, on the ground, this results in a “stick” of eight explosions, as though the site was bombed by one of the larger multi-engine bomber types.

British shipping is also awfully fragile, at least for dramatic purposes. We see three British ships get sunk, one by a submarine, and two by bombing. All three capsized to the starboard side before sinking, which seems unlikely.

We always stay through the credits, and I got a substantial thrill seeing that twelve of the “small ships” that took part in the Dunkirk evacuation were used in the making of the movie.

This entry was originally posted at http://sinister-sigils.dreamwidth.org/311711.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

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